white hart

Sing of Her – Poetry by Darian

My darling partner, THL Darian, has written and read aloud a poem for me every time he’s fought for me in the Tournament of the White Hart. This year’s tournament was no different, though I’ve been remiss in getting the poem posted for him. This one has no accompanying documentation, but that’s okay. Someone once told him he needs to upload these so that he can share his work, so I’ll gladly help with that. (I also don’t mind reading them every now and then.)


Sing of Her

Darian Valski

 

Oh muses hear my solemn plea

Do gift my lips with quality

So I might speak of persons grand

And have it known throughout our land

The words that travel with her name

Have barely reached her by their claim

To this true cause and small effect

I will today stand and correct

My noble friends and good company

Listen close while truth is free

 

As mother Sol smiles on this day

With great acts of sword and play

To remind the Gods of ages past

And steal their gaze then hold it fast

Amidst the wonder they will find

A blinding beauty and clever mind

Her actions quiet and humbly done

But by her toils hearts are won

“What is this thing!” they ask on high

“A glorious woman” the world’s reply

 

See her now as I show you

See a worth held by the few

See the mother her child a love

See her hand make that terror a dove

See the lady worth my life to hold

See this rust she craft to gold

See the artist within the fumes

See her creation feeding rooms

See my love my heart takes wing

See Astridr Vigaskegg, her name I sing

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White Hart XX Menu

This year was the 20th Anniversary of the Tournament of the White Hart in the Shire of Port Oasis. I was honored to prepare the food for the day. I had the amazing THL Cas and my awesome friend Rick in the kitchen with me for the weekend, with my love THL Darian helping with prep and plating. I had a great time in the kitchen, learned some things, got a little silly, and am ultimately looking forward to my next venture. As always, offerings are marked GF for gluten-free and V for ovo-lacto vegetarian.

White Hart XX Menu

Breakfast
Waffles (V)
Flour, eggs, sugar, milk
Oatmeal (V, GF)
Oats, egg, milk, sugar, cinnamon, butter
Eggs (V, GF)
Fruit (V, GF)

Lunch
Ale & Onion Soup (V)
Onions, Guinness, vegetable stock, butter, salt
Beef & Barley Soup
Beef, barley, onions, beef stock, parsley, sage, salt
Bread (V)
Butter (V, GF)
Butter, parsley, sage

Dinner
First Course
Meatballs
Beef, pork, onion, egg, bread crumbs, garlic, ginger,
cinnamon, mint, parsley, salt, pepper
Quiche (V)
Egg, mushroom, leek, butter, cream, salt, pepper, flour
Salad (V, GF)
Lettuce, vegetables

Second Course
Roast (GF)
Beef, pears, raisins, onions, carrots, red wine, butter, thyme, salt
Cameline Sauce (GF)
Red wine, vinegar, cloves, cinnamon, ginger, sugar, salt, corn starch
Minted Peas (V, GF)
Peas, mint, sugar
Bread (V)
Butter (V, GF)
Butter, parsley, sage

Third Course
Cherry Pie (V)
Cherries, port, sugar, flour, butter
Whipped Cream (V, GF)
Cream, sugar, vanilla

The White Heart – Poetry by Darian

I forgot that there was one last post about Ice Dragon to make! Better late than never, right?

My fiance, THL Darian, entered his first ever A&S competition at The Tournament of the White Hart in early March, then took his entry, a poem, to the Ice Dragon Pent a month later. This was the second poem he’d written for me for a White Hart Tournament, and here are two of the three versions he submitted for judging — the modern English and the Chaucerian English version.

Foreword:

This piece is an alliterative poem, following the style of The Pearl Poets Sir Gawayne and the Green Knight, dated in the late 14th century. The two copies of the same poem are in modern English, and translated to Middle English, following the dialect of Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, a contemporary piece to the Pearl Poet, written in the late 14th century as well.

The Pearl is an example of the alliterative verse revival known as the Alliterative Revival. The movement emerged in England in the mid-14th century, continuing through the 15th century. The typical characteristics of Alliterative style syllabic count, coupled with alliterative stresses. Each line would contain a separative pause, known as a caesurea, in essence splitting the line in two. The Pearl poet differentiated from some of these norms in that he allowed variable lengths to lines and groups, as well as including an end point on each stanza, known as a bob and wheel. This tradition would start with a short line, followed by a rhymed section.

Included with these works is an extra example highlighting the stresses and caesuras to better allow reading, for as many who have studied Middle English poetry will agree, it often seems meant to be read aloud.

 

The White Heart – Modern English
by THL Darian ValskiOh host please hear of humbleness true

Before thee Brought my brilliant joy

A Lord willed low by lovely might

To show thee shine I should employ

Like Paris saw Pale his paired soul

In Helens grip held the great heart fast

Come forth in form as forged in Troy

Astrid

May thee look to me,

For sadness be rid

Our hearts too, free

Look to here, I bid.

If would such words but Worthy plan

To grace the gift for my tongues relief

I should tell long tales of truest beauty

When should eyes be shift but by shy glory

I draw of her dreams as driven before

Her passion has paced the purest of chase

To home made her heart of my holy soul

The White Hart

Which Gawans hounds bayed

His travails would thwart

My hand though stayed

Wise by her Heart

As Pellinore would prove of aids plea true

Her voice made vital in verity sound

I learn fair lore from love to know

My flaw made fierce by mind fault free

To honor we hold as holy should be

Family by fortune did freely make she

For all good I gain her givith to me

I am here

And weak as a fool

Would cry voiced sheer

Upon the fates spool

Show her Glory clear

The White Heart – Middle English
by THL Darian ValskiOh host plees here of humblesse true

Bifore thee brought my Brighte joye

A Lord willed lowe by lovely might

To showe the shyne I should imploye

As Paris sawe pale his paired soule

In Helenes grip held the grate hart faste

Come forth in forme as forged in Troye

Astrid

May thee look to me

For sadnesse be rid

Our hart to free

Look here, I bid

If wold such words but worthy plan

To grace the gifte for my tonges relief

I sholde telle longe tales of truest beautee

When sholde tell eye shifte but by shy glory

I drawe of hir dreems as driven before

Hir passion has paced the purest of chase

To home made hir hart of my holy soule

The White Hart

Which Gawain houndes bayed

His travails wold thwart

My hand though stayed

Wyse by hir hart

As Pellinore wold prov of aids plee true

Hir vois made vital in verity sounde

I lern fair lore from love to know

My flaw made fiers by mind falt free

To honour we hold as holy shoulde be

Family by fortune dide freely make she

For alle good I gain she gaveth to me

I am here

And weke as a fool

Wold cry voised shere

Upon fates spool

She her glorie clere

Rabbit and Apple Quiche Recipe

As published in BMDL’s newsletter, The Althing:

Rabbit and Apple Quiche
by Lady Astridr Vigaskegg

When I cooked this for my feast at White Hart XV, I used one whole rabbit that had been boiled in herbs, then deboned, to cover 12 quiches. I can tell you that there wasn’t much rabbit in each quiche, so however much you want to add to one pie is up to your discretion.

Pie crust
Rabbit meat, pre-cooked
1 apple
1 onion
2 Tbsp olive oil
White wine
Sugar
1/2 cup milk
1/2 cup heavy cream
3 large eggs
Salt
Pepper

Preheat oven to 350*F. Prepare your pie crust. (Frozen, homemade.. however you choose!) Pull apart your rabbit meat and set it aside. Peel, core, and dice the apple and the onion. Use the oil to sautee the apple and onion, and add a dusting of sugar and a splash of white wine. Cook until apples and onions are soft, then add the rabbit meat. Add another small splash of wine and let cook for about 5 minutes, or just long enough to let the flavors start to mingle. Remove from heat and pour into the pie tin. Beat the eggs into the milk and cream, along with salt and pepper to taste, then pour into the pie tin. Bake for 30-35 min, until crust is golden brown and center of quiche is set. Let cool before serving.

White Hart XV Feast Menu

White Hart XV in 2012 marked the first full year I’d been in the SCA, and I found myself heading up the kitchens with an event themed for 16th Catalonia. Talk about intimidating. I only knew enough of a lot of things to be dangerous in regards to research, budgeting, menu planning, etc., and worrying about different food allergies was almost overwhelming. Lord Bressal Macculloch was my guide for this journey, and he encouraged me that, since I couldn’t find enough recipes for a period menu I’d be comfortable with cooking, to just go with the theme and have fun. So, with the input from many others, I did.

White Hart XV Feast Menu

First Remove:
Bread, cheese, meats
Salad
Rabbit and apple quiche
Mushroom and leek quiche
Rabbit and leek quiche
Bouillabaisse
Pea soup

Second Remove:
Roasted chicken
Romesco sauce
Peas and onions
Vegetarian paella
Fish-only paella
Paella (everything)

Third Remove:
Unsweetened custard with figs and a honey sauce
Aztec drinking chocolate
Cinnamon chocolates

 

White Hart XVII Feast Menu

The Lord and Lady of the White Hart for WHXVII are dear friends of mine, so for their special event, I wanted to do a fun menu based on their personas, so I came up with my Viking World Tour menu. We’ve all seen the concert-style t-shirts that list the places and dates of Viking invasions around Europe, and I wanted to take a dish from (or based in) that area, group them in courses based on date, and serve them something fun.

The Lutefisk was my “subtlety” for the evening. I’d built the hype up — some were excited about it, but most were dreading it. The actual dish, which was served to both HRM Timothy (and his high table) and the populace all at once, was actually a chocolate lute and Swedish fish, prepared by my co-feastocrat, Lady Odette d’Arques.

As an extra surprise, the goat I’d ordered and had butchered from a local farm came with its organ meat. After a special lunch of goat ribs with a home-made teriyaki sauce for HRM Timothy and Their Excellencies of Blackstone Mountain, I soaked in buttermilk and pan-fried the goat liver and also the goat heart(!), which I challenged HRM and the combatants of the heavy tournament to taste.

White Hart XVII Feast Menu

GF = Gluten Free
V = Ovo-lacto Vegetarian/Pescetarian friendly

Beer and Onion Soup
(England, 15th cent – Harleian MS 4016), V
Beer, onions, vegetable broth, salt, pepper

Rarebit
(Wales), V
Bread, cheese

Baked Brie
(France), GF&V
Brie, cranberries, almonds

Roasted Vegetables
(Ireland), GF&V
Carrots, parsnips, kale, olive oil, honey, salt, pepper, thyme

Pelmeni
(Russia)
Dough (flour, buttermilk, butter, sour cream), butter, beef, pork, onion, garlic, sage, salt, pepper
GF&V Alternatives: Baked potato stuffed with mashed potatoes with or without meat

Saqlabiyya
(Spain, 13th cent Al-Andalus cookbook), GF
Goat, onion, garlic, olive oil, GF soy sauce, corn starch, coriander, caraway, parsley, thyme, pepper, salt, lime zest

Couscous
(Morocco), V
Couscous, eggplant, carrot, onion, parsley, cumin, coriander, salt, pepper, garlic, veg stock, butter, lemon juice
GF Alternative: Rice with eggplant and spices

Lutefisk
(Iceland)
Fish

Stuffed dates
(Greece), GF&V
Dates, honey, almonds

Cheesecake
(Italy), GF&V
Cream cheese, sour cream, milk, butter, vanilla, salt, sugar, eggs, corn starch

Cider
(America), GF&V