vegetarian

Parsnip Pie

For my second crustless and vegetarian offering at Harvest Raid, I used a Mediterranean-influenced recipe from the French cookbook Ouverture de Cuisine. The recipe calls for salted lemon pieces, which is a reference to salt-preserved and slightly fermented lemons which first made their way into Spanish cooking from other Mediterranean and Middle Eastern influences. I ran out of time before the event and was unable to do the full correct preserved lemons, so I simply quartered lemons and left them to soak in their juices, a bit of vinegar, and salt the night before use. I added carrots for color and flavor, and I also forgot the mint on my grocery run, so I used basil instead.

To make a pie of fresh Parsnips.

Take the parsnips well washed, & put them to boil until they are cooked, then take two or three chopped onions & fry in butter, a salted lemon in pieces, nutmeg, & pepper, a little chopped mint, & put all together in the pie, & butter enough.

Note it is necessary to cut the parsnips into pieces, when the pie is half cooked put therein a little Spanish wine.

Parsnip Pie

Ingredients:
1 Preserved Lemon – 2 lemons, Kosher salt, vinegar
1 lb Parsnips
1 lb Carrots
1/2 Onion
3 Tbsp Butter
1 Tbsp Mint
1 Tbsp Ginger, minced
Cider Vinegar
Honey

Directions:
1. Prepare salt-preserved lemon. A separate post on this will be forthcoming. To prepare it quickly, dice one lemon (including the peel), removing the seeds. Toss the lemons in salt, then place into a jar with 1-2 Tbsp of vinegar and the juice of another lemon. Shake jar periodically to re-coat the lemons in the salt.

2. Wash and peel parsnips and carrots. Cut both into large chunks, in whichever style you’d like to serve them. Sautee parsnips, carrots, and onions in butter until they begin to soften, then add mint, ginger, and preserved lemons to taste.

3. Prepare a mixture of cider vinegar and honey (I can’t remember my portions at this point), then toss the vegetables in the sauce. Serve warm.

Sabina Welserin’s Genovese Tart

For the Pie Feast at Harvest Raid, I pulled from my most-loved source, Sabina Welserin’s 16th century cookbook, for one of my vegetarian offerings. Though the feast was absolutely not advertised as gluten-free, I decided to remove the crust for this dish at this specific feast. I will use a standard shortcrust for it in the future.

30 To make Genovese tart 
Take eighteen ounces of chard or spinach, three ounces of grated cheese, two and one half ounces of olive oil and the fresh cheese from six ounces of curdled milk [2]. And blanch the herbs and chop them small and stir it all together and make a good covered tart with it.

Sabina Welserin’s Genovese Tart

Ingredients:
Prepared pie crust (if not using crust, oil the pan with olive oil)
1 lb Ricotta
3 Eggs
1 c Mozarella cheese, shredded
10 oz Spinach (frozen)
1/2 Onion, chopped
Garlic, minced
Basil
Parsley
Salt
Pepper

Directions
1. Preheat oven to 350F.

2. Thaw frozen spinach according to directions, then sautee with onions, garlic, herbs and spices (to taste). Cook until onions are transparent, then set aside to cool.

3. Combine ricotta, eggs, and cheese in a bowl. Add spinach mixture and combine.

4. Pour tart mixture into pie crust or oiled pie pan and bake for 40 min, or until cooked throughout. To test for doneness, gently jiggle the pan or insert a toothpick or fork — fully-cooked tarts will not jiggle in the middle and will leave the toothpick or fork clean/without mixture.

5. Serve warm or at room temperature.

White Hart XVII Feast Menu

The Lord and Lady of the White Hart for WHXVII are dear friends of mine, so for their special event, I wanted to do a fun menu based on their personas, so I came up with my Viking World Tour menu. We’ve all seen the concert-style t-shirts that list the places and dates of Viking invasions around Europe, and I wanted to take a dish from (or based in) that area, group them in courses based on date, and serve them something fun.

The Lutefisk was my “subtlety” for the evening. I’d built the hype up — some were excited about it, but most were dreading it. The actual dish, which was served to both HRM Timothy (and his high table) and the populace all at once, was actually a chocolate lute and Swedish fish, prepared by my co-feastocrat, Lady Odette d’Arques.

As an extra surprise, the goat I’d ordered and had butchered from a local farm came with its organ meat. After a special lunch of goat ribs with a home-made teriyaki sauce for HRM Timothy and Their Excellencies of Blackstone Mountain, I soaked in buttermilk and pan-fried the goat liver and also the goat heart(!), which I challenged HRM and the combatants of the heavy tournament to taste.

White Hart XVII Feast Menu

GF = Gluten Free
V = Ovo-lacto Vegetarian/Pescetarian friendly

Beer and Onion Soup
(England, 15th cent – Harleian MS 4016), V
Beer, onions, vegetable broth, salt, pepper

Rarebit
(Wales), V
Bread, cheese

Baked Brie
(France), GF&V
Brie, cranberries, almonds

Roasted Vegetables
(Ireland), GF&V
Carrots, parsnips, kale, olive oil, honey, salt, pepper, thyme

Pelmeni
(Russia)
Dough (flour, buttermilk, butter, sour cream), butter, beef, pork, onion, garlic, sage, salt, pepper
GF&V Alternatives: Baked potato stuffed with mashed potatoes with or without meat

Saqlabiyya
(Spain, 13th cent Al-Andalus cookbook), GF
Goat, onion, garlic, olive oil, GF soy sauce, corn starch, coriander, caraway, parsley, thyme, pepper, salt, lime zest

Couscous
(Morocco), V
Couscous, eggplant, carrot, onion, parsley, cumin, coriander, salt, pepper, garlic, veg stock, butter, lemon juice
GF Alternative: Rice with eggplant and spices

Lutefisk
(Iceland)
Fish

Stuffed dates
(Greece), GF&V
Dates, honey, almonds

Cheesecake
(Italy), GF&V
Cream cheese, sour cream, milk, butter, vanilla, salt, sugar, eggs, corn starch

Cider
(America), GF&V