darian

Darian’s Onyx Scroll


The verse at the beginning of the poetry doesn’t follow any specific meter, but I tried to incorporate 1-syllable alliteration per line. The court text is adapted with permission from Master Fridrikr Tomasson. Written in Younger Futhark. Linework and runes by me, paint by Lord Sasson della Sancta Victoria. Design based on Urnes-style brooch from the Swedish History Museum, SHM 3871. https://www.flickr.com/photos/historiska/13622254033

Old Norse/Icelandic:

At haugi Gorms greri eiki Óðins
Grennir gunnmars, skald, ok þjónn
Byrðar góðar svertsteinnums
Fjallstonnum ok landbeinum
Han hefir auðveldliga þeim

Vér, Ichijo Honen, góðar Svartasteinfjalls, ok Cerridwen de Skene, elskukona hans, fremja Darri inn Valski á Bróðerni Svarta-raf. Bjoðum þetta daginn átti ok tuttugandi Harpa vetr annarr fimm tigar landsbygðar at Svartasteinfjall goðorð um Svartasteinn Bardagi.

English:

From Gorm’s Grave grows Odin’s Oak
Feeder of war-gulls, poet, servant
The burdens of Blackstone Baron
Mountain’s teeth and Land-bones
He carries them with ease

We, Ichijo Honen, baron of Blackstone Mountain, and Cerridwen de Skene, his beloved wife, induct Darri in Valski into the Order of the Onyx. Done this 28th day of April, 52 year of the settlement in the Barony of Blackstone Mountain at Blackstone Raid.

Notes:

The first line is a play on Darian’s name. Gorm’s grave refers to Wales, where the Rhodri Mawr defeated the Danish leader Gorm around 855AD. Odin’s Oak refers to Odin’s spear; perhaps not my most accurate kenning, but I liked the sound, and Darri means spears. Feeder of war-gulls means warrior (Þorbjörn Hornklofi: Glymdrápa); Mountain’s teeth and land-bones refer to rocks and stones (http://skaldic.abdn.ac.uk/db.php?if=default&table=kenning&val=ROCK).

Advertisements

Light Brought by Darkness – Poetry by Darian

THL Darian Valski, my love, wrote another poem for me for White Hart this year. I am posting the write-up below and his poem on his behalf, with his permission.

 

This poem was written following the style and structure of the Pearl Poet’s work Pearl (Perle in the middle English manuscript). There are a number of elements that characterize this complex poem which I have implemented in my own creation. Stylistically, the Perle makes use of both the allegory and dream vision genres, which I likewise utilized to maintain a common tone with the original piece.

In structure, I followed the intricate choices made by the poet, consisting of four main points. First, the Perle is composed of 101 12 line stanzas. Secondly, I used the same rhyme scheme used within the original work, that being a-b-a-b-a-b-a-b-b-c-b-c. The third characteristic I recreated was a linking word between each stanza, echoed from the last line of the proceeding stanza in the first line of the following. Lastly, the Pearl Poet wrote using alliteration throughout the piece, though it is worth noting that there was some inconsistency of its use within the greater work.

There are a few purposeful differences between Perle and my own work, which I wish to explain shortly. The first is simply the length. My piece consisted of three stanzas as it was intended to be read at White Hart before the assembled populace. The Perle not only consisted of 101 stanzas, but uses groupings of 5 stanzas denoted by a capital letter marking the beginning of each individual section. Due to both time constraints, and civility to my fellow participants, I chose to create a shorter piece. The other main deviation is that my piece is in modern English, instead of the North Western Midland example of Middle English found in the Perle manuscript. This was again chosen to allow for the populace to engage with the piece.

 

Light Brought by Darkness

I woke in wonder by a wooded way
Upon growing grass of shaded green
All life and light by where I lay
The solely somber in a happy scene
What dream I delved within that day
A sight which sours by all I’ve seen
All but for its form would be it fey
And show such life as left cold and lean
In this moving maze free of such mean
Nature’s place and province left to its peace
No shape or source of known machine
That clutched claw of man made clean

Clean sunlight stalled upon cold streams
The far shore’s sorrow willed me to shake
By the clouds’ solid shape in heaven’s seams
A marshalled maelstrom of regrets mistake
I see my silenced shadow cry empty screams
Figures bent to bear or weighted break
The memories’ grief grasped for sun’s soft gleams
Hope softly swallowed by a coiled snake
Half truths to trap what joys I take
Such simple sparks can be spent
When such fairy freedoms are proven fake
No longings loved or hand are lent
Then lent a lady to me her love
She changed a chapter in that chance
Light begot a bridge formed above
The drifting danger of flooding dance
She dipped and ducked swift as a dove
My awe alone made me advance
To meet the man I was made of
Beneath good grace, beneath her glance
It taught a truth within this trance
She healed my heart just in her hand
I shall stand sure in my stance
She is my life, my love, sworn upon our land

Sing of Her – Poetry by Darian

My darling partner, THL Darian, has written and read aloud a poem for me every time he’s fought for me in the Tournament of the White Hart. This year’s tournament was no different, though I’ve been remiss in getting the poem posted for him. This one has no accompanying documentation, but that’s okay. Someone once told him he needs to upload these so that he can share his work, so I’ll gladly help with that. (I also don’t mind reading them every now and then.)


Sing of Her

Darian Valski

 

Oh muses hear my solemn plea

Do gift my lips with quality

So I might speak of persons grand

And have it known throughout our land

The words that travel with her name

Have barely reached her by their claim

To this true cause and small effect

I will today stand and correct

My noble friends and good company

Listen close while truth is free

 

As mother Sol smiles on this day

With great acts of sword and play

To remind the Gods of ages past

And steal their gaze then hold it fast

Amidst the wonder they will find

A blinding beauty and clever mind

Her actions quiet and humbly done

But by her toils hearts are won

“What is this thing!” they ask on high

“A glorious woman” the world’s reply

 

See her now as I show you

See a worth held by the few

See the mother her child a love

See her hand make that terror a dove

See the lady worth my life to hold

See this rust she craft to gold

See the artist within the fumes

See her creation feeding rooms

See my love my heart takes wing

See Astridr Vigaskegg, her name I sing

The White Heart – Poetry by Darian

I forgot that there was one last post about Ice Dragon to make! Better late than never, right?

My fiance, THL Darian, entered his first ever A&S competition at The Tournament of the White Hart in early March, then took his entry, a poem, to the Ice Dragon Pent a month later. This was the second poem he’d written for me for a White Hart Tournament, and here are two of the three versions he submitted for judging — the modern English and the Chaucerian English version.

Foreword:

This piece is an alliterative poem, following the style of The Pearl Poets Sir Gawayne and the Green Knight, dated in the late 14th century. The two copies of the same poem are in modern English, and translated to Middle English, following the dialect of Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, a contemporary piece to the Pearl Poet, written in the late 14th century as well.

The Pearl is an example of the alliterative verse revival known as the Alliterative Revival. The movement emerged in England in the mid-14th century, continuing through the 15th century. The typical characteristics of Alliterative style syllabic count, coupled with alliterative stresses. Each line would contain a separative pause, known as a caesurea, in essence splitting the line in two. The Pearl poet differentiated from some of these norms in that he allowed variable lengths to lines and groups, as well as including an end point on each stanza, known as a bob and wheel. This tradition would start with a short line, followed by a rhymed section.

Included with these works is an extra example highlighting the stresses and caesuras to better allow reading, for as many who have studied Middle English poetry will agree, it often seems meant to be read aloud.

 

The White Heart – Modern English
by THL Darian ValskiOh host please hear of humbleness true

Before thee Brought my brilliant joy

A Lord willed low by lovely might

To show thee shine I should employ

Like Paris saw Pale his paired soul

In Helens grip held the great heart fast

Come forth in form as forged in Troy

Astrid

May thee look to me,

For sadness be rid

Our hearts too, free

Look to here, I bid.

If would such words but Worthy plan

To grace the gift for my tongues relief

I should tell long tales of truest beauty

When should eyes be shift but by shy glory

I draw of her dreams as driven before

Her passion has paced the purest of chase

To home made her heart of my holy soul

The White Hart

Which Gawans hounds bayed

His travails would thwart

My hand though stayed

Wise by her Heart

As Pellinore would prove of aids plea true

Her voice made vital in verity sound

I learn fair lore from love to know

My flaw made fierce by mind fault free

To honor we hold as holy should be

Family by fortune did freely make she

For all good I gain her givith to me

I am here

And weak as a fool

Would cry voiced sheer

Upon the fates spool

Show her Glory clear

The White Heart – Middle English
by THL Darian ValskiOh host plees here of humblesse true

Bifore thee brought my Brighte joye

A Lord willed lowe by lovely might

To showe the shyne I should imploye

As Paris sawe pale his paired soule

In Helenes grip held the grate hart faste

Come forth in forme as forged in Troye

Astrid

May thee look to me

For sadnesse be rid

Our hart to free

Look here, I bid

If wold such words but worthy plan

To grace the gifte for my tonges relief

I sholde telle longe tales of truest beautee

When sholde tell eye shifte but by shy glory

I drawe of hir dreems as driven before

Hir passion has paced the purest of chase

To home made hir hart of my holy soule

The White Hart

Which Gawain houndes bayed

His travails wold thwart

My hand though stayed

Wyse by hir hart

As Pellinore wold prov of aids plee true

Hir vois made vital in verity sounde

I lern fair lore from love to know

My flaw made fiers by mind falt free

To honour we hold as holy shoulde be

Family by fortune dide freely make she

For alle good I gain she gaveth to me

I am here

And weke as a fool

Wold cry voised shere

Upon fates spool

She her glorie clere