My Millrind Scroll

Something else happened at Ice Dragon this year — I received my grant-level award for service, Æthelmearc’s Order of the Millrind. Not only was I floored by being inducted into this order, but the scroll itself absolutely blew me away. Scrolling through my blog, you’ll find that I’ve been studying Old Icelandic and Old Norse, and Master Fridrikr Tomasson has been gracious and patient with me as I’ve asked for his assistance with proofing my very basic works. Master Fridrikr studies and composes his own poetry and songs in Old Norse and Old Icelandic, and he did me the incredible honor of composing (because it can be called no less!) my scroll. THL Sophie Davenport calligraphed it, basing it on an early 14th century Icelandic manuscript, and I am so eager to get this framed properly and hung on my wall. So here is a photo of the scroll, and the notes and work from Master Fridrikr.

 

Dottir vigaskeggs – Littu! – Fríðr Ássir – Littu! Hon hveri skaldar kvæða —

Hvergætr at stömpum ·
sjóða mat Sölvas ·
góðarhöllum Hlín ·
heilsar steinnar svart! ·
Hungra eða þorstlátr ·
arins-Frigg þeim huggar ·
Jarðar elskað Ás iel ·
elli ormvangs Ullar!

Margar dagstundar hefa starfaði hon at sóðhusi góðar svertsteinnum. Margar dagstundar hefa spenna er armanna at góðarhöllum. Hon hafa fœrðir líta á riki grœna var.

Fyrar á hlutar þessa ok hlýja arinheilas hennar ok sólbros, Vér, Margerite, Drottning allr Aeðelmarks, ok Marcus, Konungr okkar, fremja Ástriðr Vigaskegg á Bróðerni Fjöttur Mylnar Okkar. Ok gáfu sköld hönn — Rauð, þryir höfuð ulfa ok aðilbandi silfri frettið rauð. Bjoðum þetta daginn átti Einnmanuðar vetr fyrstr sétta tigar landsbygðar at Rhydderich Hael goðorð um Blóts Drekar Ísi.

Behold the the Daughter of Battle-Bearded – Beloved of the gods! She of whom the poet spoke:

The cauldron keeper cooks
meat in Solvi’s s tub —
The Goddess of the hall
of the Black Stone chieftain hails!
Hungry or thirsty, them
the Hearth-goddess comforts —-
Gods’ beloved of the ancient ground
of the serpent field of Ullr’s storm!

She has toiled many hours in the kitchens of Blackstone Baron. She has spent many days as steward in the Baron’s halls. She has given in countless ways to make our Sylvan realm shine!

For these things, and for her heart-warmth and sun-smile, We, Marguerite, Queen of All Æthelmearc, and Marcus, Our King, advance Ástríðr Vigaskegg to our Most Noble Order of the Millrind. Also, we grant her arms: Gules, three wolf’s heads couped argent and a chief argent fretty gules. Done this 8th day of April, in the 51st year of the settlement, in Our Barony of the Rhydderich Hall, at the Feast of the Ice Dragon!

NOTES:

Astriðr´s name literally means “Beloved of the Gods, Battle Beard” – this leads to two verbal “tricks” I played here. The first is in the beginning of the scroll where I address her directly. The second is in the poem. So, to the poem.
This is an attempt at writing málahátr <http://www.trobar.org/prosody/pnort.php>, one of the older poetic forms. It has several kennings in it:

line 1-2: This is a kenning describing Ástriðr as a cook. “stömpum mat Solvas” [Solvi’s meat tub] comes from chapter 145 of Njals saga. Solvi is a meat-seller who winds up head first in his own boiling meat cauldron. Who says the Norse weren’t funny.

lines 3-4: “góðarhöllum Hlín” [Hlín of the chieftain’s hall] – the Goddess of the hall is the steward. Thus, Ástriðr.

lines 5-6: “arins-Frigg” [Frigg of the hearth] – Goddess of the hearth – again, the generous Ástriðr.

lines 7-8: Two kennings here. “elskað Ás” [beloved of the Gods] and “jarðar elli ormvangs” [the ancient ground of the serpent field] > BEARD + “Ullar iel” [Ullr’s storm] > BATTLE. This is a complex kenning for Ástriðr’s name.

The only other wording of note is the naming of the order. As the word “millrind” does not exist in Old Norse. So, I used “Bróðerni Fjöttur Mylnar” [Brotherhood of the Fetter of the Mill].

The scroll itself is by THL Sophie Davenport. It is modeled on the manuscript, AM 45, the Codex Frisianus, created between 1300-1324. You can find the images of the manuscript here <https://handrit.is/en/manuscript/imaging/da/AM02-045…>.

Sasson’s Keystone Scroll

At Ice Dragon this weekend, my dear friend Lord Sasson della Sancta Victoria received his Keystone (AoA-level service award) in Their Majesties’ evening court, and I had the distinct pleasure of being responsible for the scroll for this award. Sasson is one of my oldest friends, and I wanted to do something special for him, so I sneakily asked him in advance for a list of the individuals who inspire him most in the SCA. I was given a list of his Laurel, Mistress Ann Greye, the late Master Fiachra Bonesetter, myself!, Countess Kallista Morganova, and Baroness Chrestienne de Waterdene. Along with Their Majesties Marcus and Margerite and himself, I put worked all of these individuals into this scroll, then shipped it up to BMDL to the wonderful Master Kameshima Zentarou Umakai for wording and calligraphy. It’s based on the Reformatio Languentis Animae, Manuscript (MS Douce 373), c. 1538, found online at the Web Gallery of Art. For my part, I used India ink pens on Bristol paper.

 

Reformatio Languentis Animae, Manuscript (MS Douce 373), c. 1538

White Hart XX Menu

This year was the 20th Anniversary of the Tournament of the White Hart in the Shire of Port Oasis. I was honored to prepare the food for the day. I had the amazing THL Cas and my awesome friend Rick in the kitchen with me for the weekend, with my love THL Darian helping with prep and plating. I had a great time in the kitchen, learned some things, got a little silly, and am ultimately looking forward to my next venture. As always, offerings are marked GF for gluten-free and V for ovo-lacto vegetarian.

White Hart XX Menu

Breakfast
Waffles (V)
Flour, eggs, sugar, milk
Oatmeal (V, GF)
Oats, egg, milk, sugar, cinnamon, butter
Eggs (V, GF)
Fruit (V, GF)

Lunch
Ale & Onion Soup (V)
Onions, Guinness, vegetable stock, butter, salt
Beef & Barley Soup
Beef, barley, onions, beef stock, parsley, sage, salt
Bread (V)
Butter (V, GF)
Butter, parsley, sage

Dinner
First Course
Meatballs
Beef, pork, onion, egg, bread crumbs, garlic, ginger,
cinnamon, mint, parsley, salt, pepper
Quiche (V)
Egg, mushroom, leek, butter, cream, salt, pepper, flour
Salad (V, GF)
Lettuce, vegetables

Second Course
Roast (GF)
Beef, pears, raisins, onions, carrots, red wine, butter, thyme, salt
Cameline Sauce (GF)
Red wine, vinegar, cloves, cinnamon, ginger, sugar, salt, corn starch
Minted Peas (V, GF)
Peas, mint, sugar
Bread (V)
Butter (V, GF)
Butter, parsley, sage

Third Course
Cherry Pie (V)
Cherries, port, sugar, flour, butter
Whipped Cream (V, GF)
Cream, sugar, vanilla

Early 16th Century German Outfit

Warning: This is a bit of a quick-and-dirty post to get the beginnings of this project out!

Several months ago, I finally put scissors to fabric and began putting together an early 16th century German dress. I’d been researching for some time, but it took a lot of mental preparation to work myself up to the idea of constructing a late-period garment on my own. For this dress, I drew inspiration primarily from two Hans Holbein sketches of a Basel woman from 1523.

I began with my own measurements and looking at patterns from both Katafalk and Reconstructing History, but found that neither really worked for my body. So I ended up fitting myself and making my own, which was a long and infuriating process — next time I’m having a friend help me fit a new pattern.

When I finished my bodice pattern (which was slightly modified after these photos), I cut an interlining of heavy linen and the wool shell, then attached them mostly following Katafalk’s tutorial. I cut the guards out of black wool and attached them after the bodice was all put together, then moved onto the skirt.

Using Mistress Genoveva’s Rolled Pleat Calculator, I came up with the length needed for my skirt, which I think was about 6 yards. I had a whole bolt of red wool from JoAnn Fabrics, and I only used a half-width of the fabric for the top portion of the skirt. I spent several hours with a ruler and chalk, and by the end of it I had my skirt pleated.

I ended up piecing the bottom stripes together in three panels of stripes, then sewed them together and attached them. Next time, I’ll likely attach the stripes before I pleat the skirt, but it didn’t create any major inconveniences doing it the other way.

It was after I completed the skirt that I started running out of time leading up to Fall Coronation of Marcus and Margerite, so I decided to put my plans for the sleeves on the back burner — it would be easy enough to take the middle-class route and simply sew the exaggerated stitching at the joints over the chemise. The proper chemise also wasn’t going to happen in time, so I pulled a cheater shirt out for the event.

The last piece of the outfit that I could accomplish in time was the hemd and steuchlein, which I made following Katafalk’s tutorials. The hemd was even more difficult to fit by myself than the bodice pattern was, and I was extremely glad to cover it and all the mistakes I made on it with the steuchlein.

There weren’t a great deal of photos of the good-enough dress I took to the event, but I was pretty pleased with it. I’m currently working on the more-correct sleeves, a pleated chemise, and fixing some general mistakes on the dress. Ideally, there will also be a structured linen kirtle to go under this dress and over the chemise.

Marginalia Box

I took a leap last fall and joined our kingdom’s Artisan Exchange. My recipient was a new member of the SCA, and I decided to make something fun for her — a wooden box decorated with marginalia. I ultimately ran out of time and didn’t get to add the whitework borders I’d intended, but I’m pretty happy with it otherwise. Painting and clean lines aren’t my forte by any means, but this project was a lot of fun.

 

Owl: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/244038873537915416/ Stowe 17 f. 24r

Cowfish head: http://discardingimages.tumblr.com/…/cowfish-luttrell… Luttrell Psalter, England ca. 1325-1340 British Library, Add 42130, fol. 154v

Cat: http://discardingimages.tumblr.com/…/butt-licking-cat… Book of Hours, Lyon, ca. 1505-1510. Lyon, BM, Ms 6881, fol. 30r

Squirrel: I can’t find my squirrel reference. 😐

Porcupine: http://www.medievalists.net/…/week-medieval-manuscript…/ VerdunBM107

Snail: I can’t find my snail reference right now either. 😐

Bunnies: http://www.cnn.com/2016/06/14/arts/medieval-subversive-art/ Ms 107, Breviaire de Renaud de Bar (1302-1304), fol.-89r, Verdun

Fladen

Fladen. If you Google the word (and add “food” in the search as well, to avoid the fishing coveralls..), you’ll find modern pictures of flatbread pizza. Let this reassure you that some things don’t actually change (much).

Ein Buch von gutter spise, 1350, contains several fladen recipes, and the three I sourced specifically call for these basics: A mixture of meat and cheese, bound with egg, placed on a leaf of dough, which is then baked.

In two of these recipes, the meat is specifically “chopped small”, which, personally, calls to mind modern meatloaf — ground beef (and other things) bound with egg. Another two call for mixtures of both beef (belly, loin, sirloin, and rib meat) and chicken. The recipes I used aren’t overly specific about spices, though it appears salt and pepper were among the norm.

So, armed with this knowledge, I decided to Live The Dream and serve flatbread pizza at this pub-feast.

For 6 9×13″ pans of fladen, we used roughly 4lbs of skirt steak, 4lbs of chicken, 4lbs of bacon, 3 tubs of shaved Parmesan cheese, and less than one 5c bag of shredded mozzarella cheese.

Pick your dough recipe of choice, make it, and press it into an oiled pan. We next sprinkled basil and kosher salt over the crust, then began layering our meats. The steak and chicken had been cooked in salt, pepper, and garlic, and the bacon fried until just cooked, and I cut them all with kitchen shears before layering them. The cheeses came next, and they baked for about half an hour at about 400F. (Trust your dough recipe for the bake time.)

For this experiment, the flatbread dough recipe I’d chosen was not ideal, and it ended up a good deal thicker than I’d wanted, but was great for a thicker crust pizza. Bacon, of course, makes everything better, and I’ll absolutely be doing this again.

86. Einen fladenEin Buch von gutter spise
Der einen fladen machen wölle von fleische. der nem fleisch. daz do ge von dem lumbel oder von dem wenste. und nim knücken und daz daz wol gesoten werde. und hackez cleyne. und ribe halb als vil keses drunder. und mengez mit eyern. daz ez dicke werde. und würtzez mit pfeffer. und slahe ez uf ein blat von teyge gemacht und schiuz ez in einen ofen. und laz ez backen. und giv in dar also heiz.

He who wants to make a fladen of meat. He takes meat from the sirloin or of the belly. And take bony pieces of meat (possibly ribs) and that that becomes well boiled. And cut it small. And grate half as much cheese thereunder. And mix it with eggs, (so) that it becomes thick. and spice it with pepper and pound (put) it on a leaf made of dough and shove it in an oven and let it bake and give it there also hot.

87. Einen fladen (A fladen) Ein Buch von gutter spise
Aber einen fladen von wensten und von knucken wol gesoten. und rip aber als vil keses drunder. als vil des fleisches ist. und rüerez wol. und mengez with eyern. des viertels als vil hüener drunder gestrauwet. sie sint gesoten oder gebraten. dan mache alles uf ein blat von teyge. und schiuz in eynen ofen un laz backen. und give in also heiz hin für die herren. und versaltz niht. daz ist auch gut.

But a fladen of belly (meat) and of bony pieces of meat (possibly ribs) well boiled. And grate but as much cheese thereunder, as much as the meat is. And give it impetus well and mix it with eggs. A fourth as much hen thereunder sprinkled; it is boiled or roasted. Then make all on a leaf of dough and shove it in a oven and let it bake. And give it also hot out for the masters. And do not oversalt. That is also good.

92. Einen fladen (A fladen) – Ein Buch von gutter spise
Der einen fladen wölle machen von fleische von lumbeln gemacht. des siedez wol und hackez cleine. und ribe keses genue drin. und slahe eyer auch genue drin. und würtz ez wol. und machen ein blat von teyge gesetzt. dri ecken von basteln als ein schilt. in den fladen. und mit hüenren gefült. und versaltz niht. und gibz hin.

How one wants to make a fladen of meat of the loin. Boil that well and chop it small. And grate cheese enough therein. And beat eggs also enough therein. And spice it well. And put on a leaf made of dough. Three squares (or chevrons) of basteln as a shield in the cake. And with chicken filled. And do not oversalt. And give out.

Pipefarces

Let’s talk pipefarces.

Earlier this year, I had been lazily researching for an idea I’d had for a class, which essentially was how to pad your medieval menu with food that’s easily relatable to the modern palate. Several years ago, I’d discovered that whipped cream was a medieval treat, but discovering pipefarces blew that out of the water.

Take egg yolks and flour and salt, and a little wine, and beat together strongly, and cheese chopped in thin slices, and then roll the slices of cheese in the batter, and then fry in an iron skillet with oil in it. This can also be made using beef marrow.

Mozzarella sticks? In a medieval cookbook? Yes. Yes, mozzarella sticks, as we know and love them today, in Le Menagier de Paris, 1393.

The recipe is easy enough — roll cheese slices in a simple batter and fry them. For this feast, I had my kitchen staff dip the cheese in egg, then breadcrumbs, repeat that, and then place them in the hot oil. Though not the precise same method, this one is tried and true, and resulted in perfect mozzarella sticks. (I also pre-made some gluten-free mozz sticks using gluten-free breadcrumbs!) I’ll take the steps to combine the flour and egg mixture the next time I make these for an event.

Lord Ulrich Eisenhand and Rohesia Whytemere, my fry cooks! Photo by Lord Sasson della Sancta Victoria.