Scrolls

Completed works, blanks, and more!

Augmentation of Arms Scroll

 

Truth time. I’m struggling with this one, folks, and I’m still not sure these are the right words. I was surprised when I was called into court at Pennsic, and even more so when His Majesty Timothy handed me a tissue and rose to tell the tale of why he and Her Majesty were so moved to do this. I’ve only been a member of the Society for about 7 years, and when I look at the list of all the others who have received this award before me, I feel small. These are outstanding individuals who have dedicated many, many years of their lives to making our Kingdom and our Society a better place to live and work and play in. For my part, I have only done a fraction of all their work, but I am now more resolute than ever that I will continue to strive to better both my kingdom and myself.

It also makes me incredibly happy this scroll’s calligraphy was done by the other Astridr Viga-something in my Kingdom. 😀

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My Millrind Scroll

Something else happened at Ice Dragon this year — I received my grant-level award for service, Æthelmearc’s Order of the Millrind. Not only was I floored by being inducted into this order, but the scroll itself absolutely blew me away. Scrolling through my blog, you’ll find that I’ve been studying Old Icelandic and Old Norse, and Master Fridrikr Tomasson has been gracious and patient with me as I’ve asked for his assistance with proofing my very basic works. Master Fridrikr studies and composes his own poetry and songs in Old Norse and Old Icelandic, and he did me the incredible honor of composing (because it can be called no less!) my scroll. THL Sophie Davenport calligraphed it, basing it on an early 14th century Icelandic manuscript, and I am so eager to get this framed properly and hung on my wall. So here is a photo of the scroll, and the notes and work from Master Fridrikr.

 

Dottir vigaskeggs – Littu! – Fríðr Ássir – Littu! Hon hveri skaldar kvæða —

Hvergætr at stömpum ·
sjóða mat Sölvas ·
góðarhöllum Hlín ·
heilsar steinnar svart! ·
Hungra eða þorstlátr ·
arins-Frigg þeim huggar ·
Jarðar elskað Ás iel ·
elli ormvangs Ullar!

Margar dagstundar hefa starfaði hon at sóðhusi góðar svertsteinnum. Margar dagstundar hefa spenna er armanna at góðarhöllum. Hon hafa fœrðir líta á riki grœna var.

Fyrar á hlutar þessa ok hlýja arinheilas hennar ok sólbros, Vér, Margerite, Drottning allr Aeðelmarks, ok Marcus, Konungr okkar, fremja Ástriðr Vigaskegg á Bróðerni Fjöttur Mylnar Okkar. Ok gáfu sköld hönn — Rauð, þryir höfuð ulfa ok aðilbandi silfri frettið rauð. Bjoðum þetta daginn átti Einnmanuðar vetr fyrstr sétta tigar landsbygðar at Rhydderich Hael goðorð um Blóts Drekar Ísi.

Behold the the Daughter of Battle-Bearded – Beloved of the gods! She of whom the poet spoke:

The cauldron keeper cooks
meat in Solvi’s s tub —
The Goddess of the hall
of the Black Stone chieftain hails!
Hungry or thirsty, them
the Hearth-goddess comforts —-
Gods’ beloved of the ancient ground
of the serpent field of Ullr’s storm!

She has toiled many hours in the kitchens of Blackstone Baron. She has spent many days as steward in the Baron’s halls. She has given in countless ways to make our Sylvan realm shine!

For these things, and for her heart-warmth and sun-smile, We, Marguerite, Queen of All Æthelmearc, and Marcus, Our King, advance Ástríðr Vigaskegg to our Most Noble Order of the Millrind. Also, we grant her arms: Gules, three wolf’s heads couped argent and a chief argent fretty gules. Done this 8th day of April, in the 51st year of the settlement, in Our Barony of the Rhydderich Hall, at the Feast of the Ice Dragon!

NOTES:

Astriðr´s name literally means “Beloved of the Gods, Battle Beard” – this leads to two verbal “tricks” I played here. The first is in the beginning of the scroll where I address her directly. The second is in the poem. So, to the poem.
This is an attempt at writing málahátr <http://www.trobar.org/prosody/pnort.php>, one of the older poetic forms. It has several kennings in it:

line 1-2: This is a kenning describing Ástriðr as a cook. “stömpum mat Solvas” [Solvi’s meat tub] comes from chapter 145 of Njals saga. Solvi is a meat-seller who winds up head first in his own boiling meat cauldron. Who says the Norse weren’t funny.

lines 3-4: “góðarhöllum Hlín” [Hlín of the chieftain’s hall] – the Goddess of the hall is the steward. Thus, Ástriðr.

lines 5-6: “arins-Frigg” [Frigg of the hearth] – Goddess of the hearth – again, the generous Ástriðr.

lines 7-8: Two kennings here. “elskað Ás” [beloved of the Gods] and “jarðar elli ormvangs” [the ancient ground of the serpent field] > BEARD + “Ullar iel” [Ullr’s storm] > BATTLE. This is a complex kenning for Ástriðr’s name.

The only other wording of note is the naming of the order. As the word “millrind” does not exist in Old Norse. So, I used “Bróðerni Fjöttur Mylnar” [Brotherhood of the Fetter of the Mill].

The scroll itself is by THL Sophie Davenport. It is modeled on the manuscript, AM 45, the Codex Frisianus, created between 1300-1324. You can find the images of the manuscript here <https://handrit.is/en/manuscript/imaging/da/AM02-045…>.

Sasson’s Keystone Scroll

At Ice Dragon this weekend, my dear friend Lord Sasson della Sancta Victoria received his Keystone (AoA-level service award) in Their Majesties’ evening court, and I had the distinct pleasure of being responsible for the scroll for this award. Sasson is one of my oldest friends, and I wanted to do something special for him, so I sneakily asked him in advance for a list of the individuals who inspire him most in the SCA. I was given a list of his Laurel, Mistress Ann Greye, the late Master Fiachra Bonesetter, myself!, Countess Kallista Morganova, and Baroness Chrestienne de Waterdene. Along with Their Majesties Marcus and Margerite and himself, I put worked all of these individuals into this scroll, then shipped it up to BMDL to the wonderful Master Kameshima Zentarou Umakai for wording and calligraphy. It’s based on the Reformatio Languentis Animae, Manuscript (MS Douce 373), c. 1538, found online at the Web Gallery of Art. For my part, I used India ink pens on Bristol paper.

 

Reformatio Languentis Animae, Manuscript (MS Douce 373), c. 1538

Backlog AoA Scroll

I completed my first (backlog) AoA scroll and turned it in at Ice Dragon this past weekend. I was incredibly nervous about it, but after speaking to our lovely backlog signet, I’m going to proceed with confidence with scrolls at this level. (And because they’re fun.) Sometime in the future, I want to learn some basic woodworking and/or carving so I can start making real runestones and more tactile Viking-inspired art. The photo below is angled a bit oddly, but I rather liked this one.

image

Latin transliteration of Younger Futhark runes:
Timoþi * konongr * ok * Gabrili * drotningar * buþu * þorstin * vigdison * þisi * iþumaþr * huir * birþist * i * þira * turnimenti * koronom * ok * baþu * þir * honom * merkisbuþr * i * birthdai * batle * ok * bal * i * niþgard * i * sibtimbir * u * as * l

Old Norse/Icelandic:
Timothy konongr ok Gabrielle dróttningar buďu Thorstein Vigdisson, þessi iďjumaďr hverr berďist í þeira turnimenti kórónum, ok bàďu þeir honom merkisburďr i Birthday Battle ok Ball i Nithgaard i September V, AS L.

English:
King Timothy and Queen Gabrielle summoned Thorstein Vigdisson, this hardworking man who fought in their crown tournament, and bade they him the carrying of arms at Birthday Battle and Ball in Nithgaard, in September 5, AS 50.

Based on the U 346 Frösunda stone, which was located in Frösunda, Sweden, and dated to the first half of the 11th century.

Agincourt A&S Tourney Scroll

image

On October 17th, the Barony-Marche of the Debatable Lands here in Æthelmearc celebrated the 10th anniversary of their Agincourt event. A dear friend of mine ran the A&S competition for the event and asked me to create an awards scroll for it, so I did! This was my first scroll going out to a member of the populace, so I was pretty nervous about it — but the recipient rather liked it, so I was satisfied.

The scrolls reads: <Sylvester> “showed great skill in the arts and sciences tourney at Agincourt in the Barony-Marche of the Debatable Lands on the seventeenth day of October, AS Fifty.”

Illumination is in India ink and is based on the 11th century rune stone 1047 U at Björklinge church in Uppsala, Uppland, Sweden.

Text is in English, transliterated from Latin script to Elder Futhark runes.

Letter of Intent Scroll

Next month, my love Darian and I are entering our very first Crown Tournament. Because this is special to us, and because I was inspired by THL Gwydeon’s own LOI scroll from a couple tourneys back, I decided to try my hand at illumination.

The scroll-work was all free-handed, and I had to buy a higher quality set of gouache to get decent paints that I liked. (My first set was..not great.) This was my first serious attempt at painting with gouache, and it’s something I intend to work at. I’m not the best at painting, or at straight lines for that matter — linework and cartoon-style drawing are more my style.

There are so, so many mistakes, but I’ve been told that as this is my first scroll ever, it’s something to be proud of. And really, I am. I’ve spent months learning enough Old Norse and Old Icelandic to be dangerous, and Master Fridrikr was kind enough to help me out with some syntax issues in one of the last drafts of the brag. I tweaked it a little bit after his revisions, so it (again) may not read exactly correctly, but I think Old Icelandic is more of an art form anyway, haha.

Here’s all the research I put into it:

Scroll is free-handed by Lady Astridr in the style of several rune stones, in India ink and gouache on Strathmore Mixed Media Paper, 400 series 140lb. From top to bottom, it is based on designs and elements from the following stones:

Rasmund Carving – Sodermanland, Sweden 11th century
Harald Bluetooth’s Stone – Jelling, Denmark 10th century
Ledberg Stone – Ostergotland, Sweden 11th century
G 134 Stone – Gotland, Sweden 11th century

Words are in the style of an Old Norse Brag, which was written in English and then translated into Old Icelandic, then transliterated to Younger Futhark by Lady Astridr. Old Icelandic proofreading courtesy of Master Fridrikr Tomasson.

Note: Revisions were made to the Old Icelandic text after Master Fridrikr’s revisions to reflect Darian’s current accomplishments — so if there are any mistakes, they are surely not his fault. 🙂

Old Icelandic Brag:

Darri inn Valski, kallaðr Darian, hét skjaldsveinn mikill í ríkum Aethelmearcum. Hann var húskarl Maynards hertogi ok Kappi Rhydderich Haels ok Kappi Sjau Perlna. Um sumar, hann sá Astridr vigaskegg ok hana elskaði. Hon tók hann suðr til Svartasteinfjall, ok eptir Þar görðu heim þeira, alað hon dottir, Elora. Varð hann þet kappi barúns, ok þá enn kallaði sighri hann yfir allir kappabarúnar, ok varð hann Kappi Sjau Perlna í annat sinn.

Um einvaldum annat Tindal konungs ok Etaine dróttningar, Darian ok Astridr í Turnimenti Kórónum kappkostar svá at þeir muni verða óðalsmannum til AEthelmearcs.

English Brag:

Darri inn Valski, called Darian, was a great shieldman in the kingdom of Aethelmearc. He was a húskarl to Duke Maynard and Champion of the Rhydderich Hael and of the Seven Pearls. In the summer, he saw Astridr vigaskegg and fell in love with her. She took him south to Blackstone Mountain, and after they made a home there, she bore a daughter, Elora. He became that baron’s champion, and then he again claimed victory over all barons’ champions, and he became Champion of the Seven Pearls a second time.

In the second reign of King Tindal and Queen Etaine, Darian and Astridr would strive in Crown Tournament, so that they might become the rightful heirs to AEthelmearc.