Misc

Sing of Her – Poetry by Darian

My darling partner, THL Darian, has written and read aloud a poem for me every time he’s fought for me in the Tournament of the White Hart. This year’s tournament was no different, though I’ve been remiss in getting the poem posted for him. This one has no accompanying documentation, but that’s okay. Someone once told him he needs to upload these so that he can share his work, so I’ll gladly help with that. (I also don’t mind reading them every now and then.)


Sing of Her

Darian Valski

 

Oh muses hear my solemn plea

Do gift my lips with quality

So I might speak of persons grand

And have it known throughout our land

The words that travel with her name

Have barely reached her by their claim

To this true cause and small effect

I will today stand and correct

My noble friends and good company

Listen close while truth is free

 

As mother Sol smiles on this day

With great acts of sword and play

To remind the Gods of ages past

And steal their gaze then hold it fast

Amidst the wonder they will find

A blinding beauty and clever mind

Her actions quiet and humbly done

But by her toils hearts are won

“What is this thing!” they ask on high

“A glorious woman” the world’s reply

 

See her now as I show you

See a worth held by the few

See the mother her child a love

See her hand make that terror a dove

See the lady worth my life to hold

See this rust she craft to gold

See the artist within the fumes

See her creation feeding rooms

See my love my heart takes wing

See Astridr Vigaskegg, her name I sing

Marginalia Box

I took a leap last fall and joined our kingdom’s Artisan Exchange. My recipient was a new member of the SCA, and I decided to make something fun for her — a wooden box decorated with marginalia. I ultimately ran out of time and didn’t get to add the whitework borders I’d intended, but I’m pretty happy with it otherwise. Painting and clean lines aren’t my forte by any means, but this project was a lot of fun.

 

Owl: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/244038873537915416/ Stowe 17 f. 24r

Cowfish head: http://discardingimages.tumblr.com/…/cowfish-luttrell… Luttrell Psalter, England ca. 1325-1340 British Library, Add 42130, fol. 154v

Cat: http://discardingimages.tumblr.com/…/butt-licking-cat… Book of Hours, Lyon, ca. 1505-1510. Lyon, BM, Ms 6881, fol. 30r

Squirrel: I can’t find my squirrel reference. 😐

Porcupine: http://www.medievalists.net/…/week-medieval-manuscript…/ VerdunBM107

Snail: I can’t find my snail reference right now either. 😐

Bunnies: http://www.cnn.com/2016/06/14/arts/medieval-subversive-art/ Ms 107, Breviaire de Renaud de Bar (1302-1304), fol.-89r, Verdun

The White Heart – Poetry by Darian

I forgot that there was one last post about Ice Dragon to make! Better late than never, right?

My fiance, THL Darian, entered his first ever A&S competition at The Tournament of the White Hart in early March, then took his entry, a poem, to the Ice Dragon Pent a month later. This was the second poem he’d written for me for a White Hart Tournament, and here are two of the three versions he submitted for judging — the modern English and the Chaucerian English version.

Foreword:

This piece is an alliterative poem, following the style of The Pearl Poets Sir Gawayne and the Green Knight, dated in the late 14th century. The two copies of the same poem are in modern English, and translated to Middle English, following the dialect of Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, a contemporary piece to the Pearl Poet, written in the late 14th century as well.

The Pearl is an example of the alliterative verse revival known as the Alliterative Revival. The movement emerged in England in the mid-14th century, continuing through the 15th century. The typical characteristics of Alliterative style syllabic count, coupled with alliterative stresses. Each line would contain a separative pause, known as a caesurea, in essence splitting the line in two. The Pearl poet differentiated from some of these norms in that he allowed variable lengths to lines and groups, as well as including an end point on each stanza, known as a bob and wheel. This tradition would start with a short line, followed by a rhymed section.

Included with these works is an extra example highlighting the stresses and caesuras to better allow reading, for as many who have studied Middle English poetry will agree, it often seems meant to be read aloud.

 

The White Heart – Modern English
by THL Darian ValskiOh host please hear of humbleness true

Before thee Brought my brilliant joy

A Lord willed low by lovely might

To show thee shine I should employ

Like Paris saw Pale his paired soul

In Helens grip held the great heart fast

Come forth in form as forged in Troy

Astrid

May thee look to me,

For sadness be rid

Our hearts too, free

Look to here, I bid.

If would such words but Worthy plan

To grace the gift for my tongues relief

I should tell long tales of truest beauty

When should eyes be shift but by shy glory

I draw of her dreams as driven before

Her passion has paced the purest of chase

To home made her heart of my holy soul

The White Hart

Which Gawans hounds bayed

His travails would thwart

My hand though stayed

Wise by her Heart

As Pellinore would prove of aids plea true

Her voice made vital in verity sound

I learn fair lore from love to know

My flaw made fierce by mind fault free

To honor we hold as holy should be

Family by fortune did freely make she

For all good I gain her givith to me

I am here

And weak as a fool

Would cry voiced sheer

Upon the fates spool

Show her Glory clear

The White Heart – Middle English
by THL Darian ValskiOh host plees here of humblesse true

Bifore thee brought my Brighte joye

A Lord willed lowe by lovely might

To showe the shyne I should imploye

As Paris sawe pale his paired soule

In Helenes grip held the grate hart faste

Come forth in forme as forged in Troye

Astrid

May thee look to me

For sadnesse be rid

Our hart to free

Look here, I bid

If wold such words but worthy plan

To grace the gifte for my tonges relief

I sholde telle longe tales of truest beautee

When sholde tell eye shifte but by shy glory

I drawe of hir dreems as driven before

Hir passion has paced the purest of chase

To home made hir hart of my holy soule

The White Hart

Which Gawain houndes bayed

His travails wold thwart

My hand though stayed

Wyse by hir hart

As Pellinore wold prov of aids plee true

Hir vois made vital in verity sounde

I lern fair lore from love to know

My flaw made fiers by mind falt free

To honour we hold as holy shoulde be

Family by fortune dide freely make she

For alle good I gain she gaveth to me

I am here

And weke as a fool

Wold cry voised shere

Upon fates spool

She her glorie clere

Ice Dragon 2016

This past weekend, I had the privelege of being the vigil wrangler for THL Marek Viacheldrago as he sat and contemplated elevation to the Order of the Chivalry. Marek was one of my first mentors when I started fighting, and it made me incredibly happy to see the Order recognize what many of us had seen in him from the start. Being included in his day and hearing the great words spoken about him has made this one of my more memorable events, and I’m grateful to Sir Marek, his wife Sybilla, and his knight Sir Tristen for trusting me with the task of coordinating the vigil. Normally a Peer holds this position and is planning it out for more than just a couple of weeks, but Gulfnado saw his vigil quickly moved from Gulf Wars to Ice Dragon, and there were many of us who pulled it off. I first need to thank Mistress Hildarun Hugelmann, Mistress Chrestienne de Waterdene, Sir Tristen Sexwulf, Master Janos Meszaros, and of course, Lady Sybilla, for their guidance in planning and executing all and various parts of the vigil. Hilda and Chrestienne did the bulk of manning the vigil book, and Lady Aine ny Alain, Lord Sasson della Sancta Victoria, THL Darian Valski, and Sir Ian Kennovan contributed to the food. Hilda also contributed pitchers, and Sir Stefan and Mistress Marsi contributed some platters and bowls. Sir Guido, Sir Alric of the Mists, Baroness Osa, Lord Olaf Steinabrjotr, and Lady MacKenna Henderson helped with set-up and tear-down.

Sitting just a sheet-wall away, also sitting vigil before her elevation to the Laurel, was Baroness Laurencia of Carlisle, who also holds a special place in the day’s memories. When my fiance, THL Darian, had first entered the SCA, it was Laurencia and her husband Edval who took him in and helped guide and clothe him. Laurencia accomplished something I still have not — getting Darian to sit down in front of a sewing machine! I was honored to contribute food to her vigil spread well, and those recipes will follow soon.

There is so much to say about this year’s Ice Dragon, but I had to get my thank you’s out first. I’m so grateful to everyone! Thank you!!