Month: January 2017

Early 16th Century German Outfit

Warning: This is a bit of a quick-and-dirty post to get the beginnings of this project out!

Several months ago, I finally put scissors to fabric and began putting together an early 16th century German dress. I’d been researching for some time, but it took a lot of mental preparation to work myself up to the idea of constructing a late-period garment on my own. For this dress, I drew inspiration primarily from two Hans Holbein sketches of a Basel woman from 1523.

I began with my own measurements and looking at patterns from both Katafalk and Reconstructing History, but found that neither really worked for my body. So I ended up fitting myself and making my own, which was a long and infuriating process — next time I’m having a friend help me fit a new pattern.

When I finished my bodice pattern (which was slightly modified after these photos), I cut an interlining of heavy linen and the wool shell, then attached them mostly following Katafalk’s tutorial. I cut the guards out of black wool and attached them after the bodice was all put together, then moved onto the skirt.

Using Mistress Genoveva’s Rolled Pleat Calculator, I came up with the length needed for my skirt, which I think was about 6 yards. I had a whole bolt of red wool from JoAnn Fabrics, and I only used a half-width of the fabric for the top portion of the skirt. I spent several hours with a ruler and chalk, and by the end of it I had my skirt pleated.

I ended up piecing the bottom stripes together in three panels of stripes, then sewed them together and attached them. Next time, I’ll likely attach the stripes before I pleat the skirt, but it didn’t create any major inconveniences doing it the other way.

It was after I completed the skirt that I started running out of time leading up to Fall Coronation of Marcus and Margerite, so I decided to put my plans for the sleeves on the back burner — it would be easy enough to take the middle-class route and simply sew the exaggerated stitching at the joints over the chemise. The proper chemise also wasn’t going to happen in time, so I pulled a cheater shirt out for the event.

The last piece of the outfit that I could accomplish in time was the hemd and steuchlein, which I made following Katafalk’s tutorials. The hemd was even more difficult to fit by myself than the bodice pattern was, and I was extremely glad to cover it and all the mistakes I made on it with the steuchlein.

There weren’t a great deal of photos of the good-enough dress I took to the event, but I was pretty pleased with it. I’m currently working on the more-correct sleeves, a pleated chemise, and fixing some general mistakes on the dress. Ideally, there will also be a structured linen kirtle to go under this dress and over the chemise.

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Marginalia Box

I took a leap last fall and joined our kingdom’s Artisan Exchange. My recipient was a new member of the SCA, and I decided to make something fun for her — a wooden box decorated with marginalia. I ultimately ran out of time and didn’t get to add the whitework borders I’d intended, but I’m pretty happy with it otherwise. Painting and clean lines aren’t my forte by any means, but this project was a lot of fun.

 

Owl: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/244038873537915416/ Stowe 17 f. 24r

Cowfish head: http://discardingimages.tumblr.com/…/cowfish-luttrell… Luttrell Psalter, England ca. 1325-1340 British Library, Add 42130, fol. 154v

Cat: http://discardingimages.tumblr.com/…/butt-licking-cat… Book of Hours, Lyon, ca. 1505-1510. Lyon, BM, Ms 6881, fol. 30r

Squirrel: I can’t find my squirrel reference. 😐

Porcupine: http://www.medievalists.net/…/week-medieval-manuscript…/ VerdunBM107

Snail: I can’t find my snail reference right now either. 😐

Bunnies: http://www.cnn.com/2016/06/14/arts/medieval-subversive-art/ Ms 107, Breviaire de Renaud de Bar (1302-1304), fol.-89r, Verdun