Day: January 20, 2016

14th Century Cross-Stitch Badges

Close-up of the stitching on the original bag.

Close-up of the stitching on the original bag.

One of my not-so-secret works-in-progress is a long-arm cross-stitch heraldic bag for my Pelican, which will be finished in approximately a million years. I’ve learned a lot just from this one project, but I’m going to save my big post on bags and cross-stitch for a later date (and perhaps a class!). For now, I want to share with you the charts I’ve created.

The original bag (seen above) displays French and English arms and is dated to the first half of the 14th century. Examining the bag and counting stitches has lead me to the conclusion that each of these badges is in a 29×34 stitch rectangle. Each shield is surrounded by a 2 stitch wide border (making each shield 27 stitches wide and 32 stitches long at their greatest points). Using the 29×34 framework, I have spent weeks creating badges (mostly specific to AEthelmearc) for anyone who would want to create their own. These were made in MS Paint, with each pixel representing 1 stitch. MS Paint in Windows 7 allows the “View -> Gridlines” feature, which makes counting stitches/pixels much easier.

I’ve blown these up to 800%, but I can create bigger charts and share the originals upon request. There are a couple shown below, but for the rest, click on the link to the album I’ve created on imgur.

Happy stitching!

aethelmearc

pelican

 

Stuffed Eggs Recipe

In the pursuit of foods that would be very recognizable to the modern palate for my 2013 Helvetia menu, I found myself with another 16th century German recipe, this time from the anonymous Mittelniederdeutsches Kochbuch. Christianne Muusers had already translated and adapted this recipe over at her blog Coquinaria, and I had great success with it. What’s not to love about medieval fried and ‘not-so-deviled’ eggs?

Stuffed Eggs

The original author used the Mittelniederdeutsches Kochbuch, as published by Hans Wiswe (edition 1956, p.36), recipe 32, and the Ehlerts translation in modern German, in the Kochbuch des Mittelalters, p.77.

32. Item wyltu maken halve eygere, de ghevullet syn, nym eigere unde sede de hart. Snyt se mydden eyntwey. Nym den doder dar uth den wytten. Stot de doder yn eynen moser. Wen se ghestot synt, so sla dartho roe eigere. Nym salvie unde krusemynte, peper unde safferan. Unde vulle den doder wedder yn dat wytte. So legge se in bottere unde brat se aff alle hart. Nym etick unde ander eygere. Make darover eyn gud so:et. Honnich, peper unde saffran do dartho. Solte dat tomathe. Unde giff dat hen

If you want to make halved eggs that are stuffed, take eggs and boil them hard. Cut them in two. Take the yolks from the whites. Pound the yolks in a mortar. When they are mashed, mix in raw eggs. Take sage and costmary, pepper and saffron. And stuff the yolks back in the whites. Then lay them in butter and bake them very well. Take vinegar and other eggs. Make a good sauce of these. Add honey, pepper and saffron. Salt to taste. And serve it forth.

Modern Recipe:

6 hardboiled eggs
Butter

1 raw egg
The yolks of the hardboiled eggs
4 leaves mint, finely chopped
6 sage leaves, finely chopped
Salt and pepper, to taste
1/2 tsp saffron (bruised in 1/2 Tbsp hot water)

2 eggs
2 to 3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 1/2 Tbsp clear honey
Salt and pepper, to taste

Peel the hardboiled eggs and cut them in half length-wise. Take the yolks and mash them together well, then add the raw egg, the chopped herbs, and the spices (and water). Prepare your sauce by gently mixing your eggs, vinegar, honey, and salt and pepper.

Melt your butter in a pan over medium heat and fry the eggs, stuffing-side down first, for a few minutes on each side. Move them to a baking dish, pour the sauce over them, and finish in the oven at 300*F for 15min. Serve warm.