Month: January 2016

Cross-Stitch Badge Albums

I’ve created multiple albums to find the charts of the cross-stitch badges on Imgur.

For Aethelmearc Awards, go here: http://imgur.com/a/KW6P8

For Aethelmearc Groups, go here: http://imgur.com/a/GsrHE

For Other Groups, go here: http://imgur.com/a/XCrkN

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14th Century Cross-Stitch Badges

Close-up of the stitching on the original bag.

Close-up of the stitching on the original bag.

One of my not-so-secret works-in-progress is a long-arm cross-stitch heraldic bag for my Pelican, which will be finished in approximately a million years. I’ve learned a lot just from this one project, but I’m going to save my big post on bags and cross-stitch for a later date (and perhaps a class!). For now, I want to share with you the charts I’ve created.

The original bag (seen above) displays French and English arms and is dated to the first half of the 14th century. Examining the bag and counting stitches has lead me to the conclusion that each of these badges is in a 29×34 stitch rectangle. Each shield is surrounded by a 2 stitch wide border (making each shield 27 stitches wide and 32 stitches long at their greatest points). Using the 29×34 framework, I have spent weeks creating badges (mostly specific to AEthelmearc) for anyone who would want to create their own. These were made in MS Paint, with each pixel representing 1 stitch. MS Paint in Windows 7 allows the “View -> Gridlines” feature, which makes counting stitches/pixels much easier.

I’ve blown these up to 800%, but I can create bigger charts and share the originals upon request. There are a couple shown below, but for the rest, click on the link to the album I’ve created on imgur.

Happy stitching!

aethelmearc

pelican

 

Stuffed Eggs Recipe

In the pursuit of foods that would be very recognizable to the modern palate for my 2013 Helvetia menu, I found myself with another 16th century German recipe, this time from the anonymous Mittelniederdeutsches Kochbuch. Christianne Muusers had already translated and adapted this recipe over at her blog Coquinaria, and I had great success with it. What’s not to love about medieval fried and ‘not-so-deviled’ eggs?

Stuffed Eggs

The original author used the Mittelniederdeutsches Kochbuch, as published by Hans Wiswe (edition 1956, p.36), recipe 32, and the Ehlerts translation in modern German, in the Kochbuch des Mittelalters, p.77.

32. Item wyltu maken halve eygere, de ghevullet syn, nym eigere unde sede de hart. Snyt se mydden eyntwey. Nym den doder dar uth den wytten. Stot de doder yn eynen moser. Wen se ghestot synt, so sla dartho roe eigere. Nym salvie unde krusemynte, peper unde safferan. Unde vulle den doder wedder yn dat wytte. So legge se in bottere unde brat se aff alle hart. Nym etick unde ander eygere. Make darover eyn gud so:et. Honnich, peper unde saffran do dartho. Solte dat tomathe. Unde giff dat hen

If you want to make halved eggs that are stuffed, take eggs and boil them hard. Cut them in two. Take the yolks from the whites. Pound the yolks in a mortar. When they are mashed, mix in raw eggs. Take sage and costmary, pepper and saffron. And stuff the yolks back in the whites. Then lay them in butter and bake them very well. Take vinegar and other eggs. Make a good sauce of these. Add honey, pepper and saffron. Salt to taste. And serve it forth.

Modern Recipe:

6 hardboiled eggs
Butter

1 raw egg
The yolks of the hardboiled eggs
4 leaves mint, finely chopped
6 sage leaves, finely chopped
Salt and pepper, to taste
1/2 tsp saffron (bruised in 1/2 Tbsp hot water)

2 eggs
2 to 3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 1/2 Tbsp clear honey
Salt and pepper, to taste

Peel the hardboiled eggs and cut them in half length-wise. Take the yolks and mash them together well, then add the raw egg, the chopped herbs, and the spices (and water). Prepare your sauce by gently mixing your eggs, vinegar, honey, and salt and pepper.

Melt your butter in a pan over medium heat and fry the eggs, stuffing-side down first, for a few minutes on each side. Move them to a baking dish, pour the sauce over them, and finish in the oven at 300*F for 15min. Serve warm.

Leihen Helvetia! 2013 Feast Menu

Helvetia 2013 Feast Menu

First Remove
Breads
Flour, butter, oats, cranberries

Flavored butters
Butter, parsley, sage – Butter, honey

Soft Cheese
Milk, chives, onion, lemon juice, salt, pepper

Second Remove
Stuffed eggs
Egg, sage, salt, pepper, saffron, butter, honey, vinegar

Cabbage salad
Red cabbage, onion, apple, honey, red wine vinegar, cloves

Apple tart
Apple, brie, black walnuts, nutmeg, cloves, brown sugar, brandy, flour, egg

Third Remove
Chicken with onion and bacon
Chicken, onion, bacon, garlic, salt, pepper, olive oil

Pork
Pork, white wine, chicken broth, apple juice, raisins, gluten-free soy sauce,
ginger, salt, pepper, corn starch

Genovese tart
Spinach, milk, olive oil, salt, pepper, flour, egg

Applesauce
Apple, sugar, white wine, cinnamon, ginger

Fourth Remove
Blackstone Mountain cakes
Anise extract, almond, almond extract, flour, egg, milk, cream cheese, powdered sugar
Raspberries, apples, caramel, cream, honey

Gluten-free cupcakes
Aniseed, anise extract, almond, almond extract, gluten-free cake mix, egg, milk, cream cheese, powdered sugar

Strauben Recipe

As published in Æthelmearc’s unofficial companion to the Æstel, the Æstel Æxtra:

Recipe: Strauben
by Lady Astridr Vigaskegg

Strauben in the German equivalent of funnel cake. It was recorded in 1553 by a lady named Sabina Welserin in her cookbook, Das Kochbuch der Sabina Welserin. It is served with snow (whipped cream) and fruit preserves.

86 If you would bake a good fried Strauben

Then bring water to a boil and pour it on the flour, stir it together well, beat eggs into it and salt it, take a small Strauben funnel, which should have a hole as wide as a finger, and let the batter run through and fry the Strauben. The batter should be warm.

Modern Recipe:

1/2 tsp salt
2 tsp baking powder
3 2/3 c all-purpose flour
3 eggs
1/4 c white sugar
2 c milk

Mix salt, baking powder, and half the flour, then set aside.

Cream eggs, sugar, and milk. Add dry mix and beat until smooth. Add flour until desired consistency is reached. Remember, this has to run through a funnel!

Heat the oil to about 375*F, and pour in batter through funnel. Fry until golden brown, and use tongs (and maybe a spatula) to flip the cake. Drain on paper towels, then serve.

Rabbit and Apple Quiche Recipe

As published in BMDL’s newsletter, The Althing:

Rabbit and Apple Quiche
by Lady Astridr Vigaskegg

When I cooked this for my feast at White Hart XV, I used one whole rabbit that had been boiled in herbs, then deboned, to cover 12 quiches. I can tell you that there wasn’t much rabbit in each quiche, so however much you want to add to one pie is up to your discretion.

Pie crust
Rabbit meat, pre-cooked
1 apple
1 onion
2 Tbsp olive oil
White wine
Sugar
1/2 cup milk
1/2 cup heavy cream
3 large eggs
Salt
Pepper

Preheat oven to 350*F. Prepare your pie crust. (Frozen, homemade.. however you choose!) Pull apart your rabbit meat and set it aside. Peel, core, and dice the apple and the onion. Use the oil to sautee the apple and onion, and add a dusting of sugar and a splash of white wine. Cook until apples and onions are soft, then add the rabbit meat. Add another small splash of wine and let cook for about 5 minutes, or just long enough to let the flavors start to mingle. Remove from heat and pour into the pie tin. Beat the eggs into the milk and cream, along with salt and pepper to taste, then pour into the pie tin. Bake for 30-35 min, until crust is golden brown and center of quiche is set. Let cool before serving.

Venison in a Sauce Recipe

As published in the Barony of Blackstone Mountain’s newsletter, The Banner, and BMDL’s newsletter, The Althing:

Venison in a Sauce
by Lady Astridr Vigaskegg

While doing my research for the feast at Leihen Helvetia, I fell in love with this particular recipe from Das Kochbuch der Sabina Welserin. I was able to bring about ~10 gallons of venison (thanks, Dad!) to the feast, and I prepared this dish with no instructions aside from the original recipe itself. I’ve done my best to transcribe the process into approximate measurements, as “shake a handful or so of ____ over the large pan of ~4.5 gallons of venison until it looks decent” really doesn’t help anyone reading this. My two bits of advice for this are: 1.) To get as much blood out of the venison as possible, brine it once or twice in the water/vinegar solution. 2.) Play around with the spices before you add it to the venison, if you’re uncertain. As long as you keep the spices balanced, there’s no wrong way to make this, so have fun with it!

Das Kochbuch der Sabina Welserin, 1553
7 To make a sauce in which to put a haunch of venison

Lard it well and roast it and make a good sauce for it. Take Reinfal and stir cherry syrup into it, and fry Lebkuchen in fat and chop good sweet apples, almonds, cloves, cinnamon sticks, ginger, currants, pepper and raisins and let it all cook together. When you want to serve it, then pour the sauce over it. It is also for marinating a boar’s head. Then cook it in two parts water and one third vinegar. The head of a pig is also made in this manner.

Modern Recipe:
Venison
Apple cider vinegar
Water
1 c white wine
1/3 c cherry (or berry) juice concentrate
1/2 c apple cider vinegar
1 c water
2 large apples (or pears), sliced
5 whole cloves
3 small cinnamon sticks
1/4 tsp pepper
1 tsp ground ginger
1/2 c almond slivers
1/2 c currants (or dried cranberries)
1/2 c raisins
2 T butter
Lebkuchen crumbs*

Brine venison in a 1 part-salt water and 1 part-apple cider vinegar mixture for about an hour. Rinse the meat, then set into your roasting pan. Combine the wine, syrup concentrate, and vinegar with your spices and apples and pour over the venison. Cover and bake at 325*F for about 2 1/2 – 3 hours. Fry the Lebkuchen in butter, add to the sauce and drippings to thicken it.

*Note: Lebkuchen cookies are a type of gingerbread cookie made with cinnamon, cloves, cardamom, and ginger.