Aine’s Black Stone Scroll

The verse at the beginning of the poetry doesn’t follow any specific meter, but I tried to incorporate 1-syllable alliteration per line. The court text is adapted with permission from Master Fridrikr Tomasson. Written in Younger Futhark. Linework and runes by me, paint by Lord Sasson della Sancta Victoria. Design based on a valkyrie pendant from the Swedish History Museum.

Old Icelandic

Sólarljós skínr á Dáinnsdottir
Dregillshodd hon es glóðrauðr
Hondum hon gorir eldsmatr
Glóar hugansteinn allglatt
á afl svartasteinnfjalls

Vér, Ichijo Honen, góðar Svartasteinfjalls, ok Cerridwen de Skene, elskukona hans, fremja Aine ny Allane á Bróðerni Svartasteinn. Bjoðum þetta daginn átti ok tuttugandi Harpa vetr annarr fimm tigar landsbygðar at Svartasteinfjall goðorð um Svartastein Bardagi.

English:

The sun’s light shines on Dáinn’s daughter
Her ribbon’s hoard is ember-red
Her hands make fire’s food
Glows brightly the stone of thought
In Blackstone Mountain’s forge

We, Ichijo Honen, baron of Blackstone Mountain, and Cerridwen de Skene, his beloved wife, induct Aine ny Allane into the Order of the Black Stone. Done this 28th day of April, 52 year of the settlement in the Barony of Blackstone Mountain at Blackstone Raid.

Notes:

The first line is a play on Aine’s name: Aine was an Irish goddess of summer and generally means radiance, etc. Allane is supposedly an Old Irish word for deer, and Dainn was one of the four deer that feed on the low branches of Yggdrasil.

Ribbon’s hoard is a kenning for hair (original); fire’s food is literally coal, but also the work that fuels the barony (http://norse.ulver.com/dct/zoega/); the stone of thought is a kenning for heart (http://skaldic.abdn.ac.uk/db.php?if=default&table=kenning&val=HEART).

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Darian’s Onyx Scroll


The verse at the beginning of the poetry doesn’t follow any specific meter, but I tried to incorporate 1-syllable alliteration per line. The court text is adapted with permission from Master Fridrikr Tomasson. Written in Younger Futhark. Linework and runes by me, paint by Lord Sasson della Sancta Victoria. Design based on Urnes-style brooch from the Swedish History Museum, SHM 3871. https://www.flickr.com/photos/historiska/13622254033

Old Norse/Icelandic:

At haugi Gorms greri eiki Óðins
Grennir gunnmars, skald, ok þjónn
Byrðar góðar svertsteinnums
Fjallstonnum ok landbeinum
Han hefir auðveldliga þeim

Vér, Ichijo Honen, góðar Svartasteinfjalls, ok Cerridwen de Skene, elskukona hans, fremja Darri inn Valski á Bróðerni Svarta-raf. Bjoðum þetta daginn átti ok tuttugandi Harpa vetr annarr fimm tigar landsbygðar at Svartasteinfjall goðorð um Svartasteinn Bardagi.

English:

From Gorm’s Grave grows Odin’s Oak
Feeder of war-gulls, poet, servant
The burdens of Blackstone Baron
Mountain’s teeth and Land-bones
He carries them with ease

We, Ichijo Honen, baron of Blackstone Mountain, and Cerridwen de Skene, his beloved wife, induct Darri in Valski into the Order of the Onyx. Done this 28th day of April, 52 year of the settlement in the Barony of Blackstone Mountain at Blackstone Raid.

Notes:

The first line is a play on Darian’s name. Gorm’s grave refers to Wales, where the Rhodri Mawr defeated the Danish leader Gorm around 855AD. Odin’s Oak refers to Odin’s spear; perhaps not my most accurate kenning, but I liked the sound, and Darri means spears. Feeder of war-gulls means warrior (Þorbjörn Hornklofi: Glymdrápa); Mountain’s teeth and land-bones refer to rocks and stones (http://skaldic.abdn.ac.uk/db.php?if=default&table=kenning&val=ROCK).

Welserin’s Apple Pie & Hot Water Lard Crust

One of the perks of entering into Ice Dragon is that I have new content for my blog, mostly ready for web viewing. This year was the first year I’d really entered anything on my own, and I had three submissions: a pie, two lip balms, and hippocras. My documentation was rushed because of some real-life obligations, but just fine for the purposes of a blog, and not only was I happy with my execution of these entries, but the feedback was nice as well.

I’ve been excited to make this pie. Because quinces are hard to come by where I live, I substituted apples (which are found elsewhere in the book with similar spices and cooked in similar ways). The apples are peeled and cored, roasted in butter, then stuffed with currants, sugar, cinnamon, and cloves. A sauce of the same spices, wine, and animal fat is poured atop them. (I used bacon fat, because that is what I had on-hand.) The apples are placed in a coffin crust, which the author references earlier in the book.

I’ve included here the German recipes from Stopp and the English translations from Armstrong, found on David Friedman’s website.

The Original Pie

<<68>> Ain basteten von kittine zú machen

Schelt die kittine vnnd holdert die pútzen rain saúber heraús mit ainem eisselin, bacht sý jn ainem schmaltz/ darnach filt die kittine mit weinberlach, zúcker, zimerrerlach, negellen, darnach nempt das marck von ainem oxen oder ain nierenfaistin hackt klain oder ain abscheffet, das faist von ainem flesch/ vnnd thiet daran gúten malúasier oder rainfal, zúcker, rerlach, negellen, wie eúch gút dúnckt, den taig zú der pasteten fint jr no [61], wie jr jn machen solt.

68 To make a quince pie 

Peel the quinces and cut the core cleanly out with a knife, fry them in fat. After that stuff the quinces with currants, sugar, cinnamon and cloves. Afterwards take beef marrow or finely chopped kidney suet or skimmed fat from some other meat and put ood Malavosia or Reinfal on it, sugar, cinnamon and cloves, however it seems good to you. The dough for the pie is found in number [sixty one].

The Crust

<<61>> Ain pastetentaig zú machen zú allen auffgesetzten pasteten

Nempt ain mell, das pest, so jr bekomen múgen, vngefarlich 2 gút gaúffen oder darnach jr die grosß oder klain haben welt, thiets auff den disch vnnd riert 2 air mit ainem messer daran vnnd saltzt ain wenig, macht jn ainem pfenndlin ain wasser vnnd wie 2 gúte air grosß schmaltz, last es als anainander ergan vnnd sieden/ darnach schit es an das obgemelt mell ob dem disch vnnd mach ain starcken taig vnnd arbait jn woll, wie dich gút dúnckt, wan es jm somer jst, músß man an des wasser stat ain fleschbrie nemen vnnd an des schmaltz stat ain abscheffet von der súpen nemen, wan der taig gearbait jst, so machent jn zú ainer rúnden kugel vnnd thenet jn fein mit den fingern vornen aus oder mit ainem walgelholtz/ das jn der mit ain hechin beleib, darnach lands erstaren an der keltin, darnach setzent daig aúf, jn maß jch eúch gezaigt hab/ aúch balten ain taig zú der teckin vnd welget jn zú ainer deckin vnnd nempt ain wasser vnnd bestreichts oben an der deckin vnnd oben an der aúffgesetzten pasten vnnd thiets mitt den fingern woll zusamen, last an ainem ort ain klain lechlin, vnd das es woll zúsamengedruckt sey, das nicht offenstand/ blassen jn das lechlin, das jr gelassen habt, so wirt die deckin hibsch aúfflaúffen, so trúcken das lechlin von stúnd an zú, darnach thits jn offen, set vor ain mell aúff die schissel/ secht, das jr den offen recht haitzt, so wirt es ain schene pasteten, also macht man all aúffgesetzt pasteten den taig.

61 To make a pastry dough for all shaped pies 

Take flour, the best that you can get, about two handfuls, depending on how large or small you would have the pie. Put it on the table and with a knife stir in two eggs and a little salt. Put water in a small pan and a piece of fat the size of two good eggs, let it all dissolve together and boil. Afterwards pour it on the flour on the table and make a strong dough and work it well, however you feel is right. If it is summer, one must take meat broth instead of water and in the place of the fat the skimmings from the broth. When the dough is kneaded, then make of it a round ball and draw it out well on the sides with the fingers or with a rolling pin, so that in the middle a raised area remains, then let it chill in the cold. Afterwards shape the dough as I have pointed out to you. Also reserve dough for the cover and roll it out into a cover and take water and spread it over the top of the cover and the top of the formed pastry shell and join it together well with the fingers. Leave a small hole. And see that it is pressed together well, so that it does not come open. Blow in the small hole which you have left, then the cover will lift itself up. Then quickly press the hole closed. Afterwards put it in the oven. Sprinkle flour in the dish beforehand. Take care that the oven is properly heated, then it will be a pretty pastry. The dough for all shaped pastries is made in this manner.

Welserin’s Apple Pie

Ingredients:

Filling:
3 Gala apples
Butter
Handful dried currants
Cloves
Cinnamon
Sugar
Raisins
Sauce:
½ c red wine
¼ c white sugar
Cloves
Cinnamon
Bacon fat 
Crust: (makes enough for bottom crust and lid)
3 c all-purpose flour (plus more for surface)
4 oz butter (1 stick)
4 oz lard
1/3 c water
Salt
1 egg, beaten

Instructions:

  1. Pre-heat oven to 375F.
  2. Peel and core apples, but try not to puncture the bottom of the apple. (A melon baller works great for scooping out the core and seeds.) Butter baking pan, and rub butter over and in apples. Roast apples until soft.
  3. Make your crust: Prepare your flour and salt in a bowl, making a well for the liquid. Melt the butter and lard in the water, then pour into the well. Mix the dough with a spoon, then work by hand. Separate two pieces, one for the bottom crust, one for the lid. Roll it out while warm, then lay out the bottom crust in your pie plate or small springform pan. Don’t be afraid to piece the dough together if it falls apart!
  4. Place the roasted applies into the pie crust. Combine spices, sugar, and currants. Stuff apples with currants, reserve some sugar and spice blend. Add raisins to bottom of crust (just for fun!).
  5. Warm wine with sugar, spices, and bacon fat in sauce pan. Pour sauce over all fruit.
  6. Roll out the lid, then pinch crusts together. Make a hole in the lid with a wooden spoon.
  7. Bake at 375F for about 20 minutes, then add an egg wash to the top crust and bake for an additional 5-10 minutes.

 

 References

The Cookbook of Sabina Welserin, English translation by Valoise Armstrong. Published online by David Friedman. 1998. http://www.daviddfriedman.com/Medieval/Cookbooks/Sabrina_Welserin.html

Das Kochbuch der Sabina Welserin. Hg. von Hugo Stopp. Mit einer Übersetzung von Ulrike Gießmann. Heidelberg: Universitätsverlag C. Winter Heidelberg, 1980 (Germanische Bibliothek: N.F.: Reihe 4, Texte). http://www.staff.uni-giessen.de/gloning/tx/sawe.htm

Light Brought by Darkness – Poetry by Darian

THL Darian Valski, my love, wrote another poem for me for White Hart this year. I am posting the write-up below and his poem on his behalf, with his permission.

 

This poem was written following the style and structure of the Pearl Poet’s work Pearl (Perle in the middle English manuscript). There are a number of elements that characterize this complex poem which I have implemented in my own creation. Stylistically, the Perle makes use of both the allegory and dream vision genres, which I likewise utilized to maintain a common tone with the original piece.

In structure, I followed the intricate choices made by the poet, consisting of four main points. First, the Perle is composed of 101 12 line stanzas. Secondly, I used the same rhyme scheme used within the original work, that being a-b-a-b-a-b-a-b-b-c-b-c. The third characteristic I recreated was a linking word between each stanza, echoed from the last line of the proceeding stanza in the first line of the following. Lastly, the Pearl Poet wrote using alliteration throughout the piece, though it is worth noting that there was some inconsistency of its use within the greater work.

There are a few purposeful differences between Perle and my own work, which I wish to explain shortly. The first is simply the length. My piece consisted of three stanzas as it was intended to be read at White Hart before the assembled populace. The Perle not only consisted of 101 stanzas, but uses groupings of 5 stanzas denoted by a capital letter marking the beginning of each individual section. Due to both time constraints, and civility to my fellow participants, I chose to create a shorter piece. The other main deviation is that my piece is in modern English, instead of the North Western Midland example of Middle English found in the Perle manuscript. This was again chosen to allow for the populace to engage with the piece.

 

Light Brought by Darkness

I woke in wonder by a wooded way
Upon growing grass of shaded green
All life and light by where I lay
The solely somber in a happy scene
What dream I delved within that day
A sight which sours by all I’ve seen
All but for its form would be it fey
And show such life as left cold and lean
In this moving maze free of such mean
Nature’s place and province left to its peace
No shape or source of known machine
That clutched claw of man made clean

Clean sunlight stalled upon cold streams
The far shore’s sorrow willed me to shake
By the clouds’ solid shape in heaven’s seams
A marshalled maelstrom of regrets mistake
I see my silenced shadow cry empty screams
Figures bent to bear or weighted break
The memories’ grief grasped for sun’s soft gleams
Hope softly swallowed by a coiled snake
Half truths to trap what joys I take
Such simple sparks can be spent
When such fairy freedoms are proven fake
No longings loved or hand are lent
Then lent a lady to me her love
She changed a chapter in that chance
Light begot a bridge formed above
The drifting danger of flooding dance
She dipped and ducked swift as a dove
My awe alone made me advance
To meet the man I was made of
Beneath good grace, beneath her glance
It taught a truth within this trance
She healed my heart just in her hand
I shall stand sure in my stance
She is my life, my love, sworn upon our land

White Hart 2018

This past weekend, THL Darian and I entered the Tournament of the White Hart again. This event is near and dear to my heart, not only because it’s my anniversary event, but because the event and the tournament represent the courtly love and the Victorian ideals of chivalry that the SCA holds dear in its heart. I cut my teeth in the kitchens at this event, and this past weekend was the first one in a few years where I wasn’t working in them. It was strange to be able to sit in the gallery with the other consorts for the duration of the tournament, but very pleasant. The combatants filled us all with inspiration, moved us to tears, and had us in stitches.

Darian has written a poem for me every time he’s represented me at this event, and this year was no different. His poem, the questions he answered for the gallery, and his comportment lead the ladies of the gallery to choose him, and us, as the Lord and Lady of the White Hart this year. So, we get the privilege of wearing the newly-made regalia, commissioned by Lord Hrafn and Lady Rannveig, for the next year until we host this tournament ourselves to choose the 22nd Lord and Lady of the White Hart.

Beef and Bacon Pie

Ah, winter. The time of research, respite, and repair. I’ve spent much of it knee-deep in a few different books researching pies in their various forms, so when Lord Olaf Steinabrjotr approached me to make something for Æthelmearc Region One Twelfth Night, I responded with, “How about a pie?” It would, in theory, be the prize for a heavy combat tournament or a feat of strength competition, so I asked myself what typical manly fighter-types like the most. Beef. Bacon. Beer. And probably more bacon.

Easy enough. My mind went immediately to the Beef and Bacon Pies found over at Inn at the Crossroads.

She uses and redacts a 16th century English recipe from A Propre New Booke of Cokery, 1545, but I found this recipe to be lacking in the spices that my palate craves for this. So I went searching through my beloved resource, The Cookbook of Sabina Welserin (published 1553 — merely 8 years of difference here), and went searching for her own take on beef pies.

Here are the recipes I used for reference:

A Propre New Booke of Cokery, 1545, per Inn at the Crossroads:

To make Pyes.

Pyes of mutton or beif must be fyne mynced & seasoned with pepper and salte and a lytel saffron to colour it, suet or marrow a good quantitie, a lytell vynegre, pruynes, great reasons, and dates, take the fattest of the broath of powdred beefe.

Das Kochbuch der Sabina Welserin, 1553: 

120 If you would make a game pie, which should be warm

Lard the game well and cook it and make a formed [pastry] dish and lay in it preserved limes and cinnamon sticks and currants and lay the game therein and also put beef suet into it and a little Malavosia and let it cook. This pie is better warm than cold.

152 To make a good roast

Take veal or a sirloin of beef, lay it overnight in wine, afterwards stick it on a spit. Put it then in a pot. Put good broth therein, onions, wine, spices, pepper, ginger and cloves and let it cook therein. Do not over salt it.

68 To make a quince pie

Peel the quinces and cut the core cleanly out with a knife, fry them in fat. After that stuff the quinces with currants, sugar, cinnamon and cloves. Afterwards take beef marrow or finely chopped kidney suet or skimmed fat from some other meat and put good Malavosia or Reinfal on it, sugar, cinnamon and cloves, however it seems good to you. The dough for the pie is found in number [sixty one].

Given that marrow bones are difficult to come by for me, I opted to follow the Inn at the Crossroads recipe and swap bacon in for it. However, unlike that recipe, I absolutely reserved the bacon fat — though the flavor profile of this pie is inherently different because of the bacon, the richness is still there because of that reserved fat. I added currants, ginger, cloves, and cinnamon to the English recipe, ultimately turning this pie into something inherently more German for the time. I then tucked it all into a standard short paste crust and made a thickened sauce with the plentiful drippings. The end result was much sweeter than I’d anticipated because of the dates, but ultimately exactly what I’d wanted: a hearty 16th century pie.

 

Astrid’s Beef and Bacon Pie

For the pie:
2 lbs beef roast
6 slices thick-cut bacon, chopped
Handful dried currants
Handful raisins
Handful dates, seeded and chopped
Powdered ginger
Powdered cloves
Powdered cinnamon
Salt
32 oz Beef Broth
1/4 c red wine vinegar, approximately
1 c water, approximately
Flour or cornstarch

For 1 crust:
2 c flour, approx.
1 c butter, cubed
Pinch salt
Ice water

  1. Cube beef, then sear on all sides in pan. Set aside.
  2. Chop bacon, fry in pot. Do not strain fat. Add beef, dried fruit, spices, beef broth, vinegar and water.
  3. Bring to a boil, then cover and simmer until liquid is reduced and beef is tender.
  4. Set the meat and fruit aside, straining all solids from the liquid. Separate about 1/4 c of the liquid from the rest.
  5. Add flour or cornstarch to thicken, stirring over low heat until desired consistency is reached.
  6. Prepare short crust (2 batches if you want the crust and a lid), blind-baking the bottom crust at 350*F for 10-15 min.
  7. Add meat and fruit and the reserved 1/4 c liquid. Cover with lid; press crusts together and poke a hole in the lid.
  8. Bake at 350*F until crust begins to brown. Add an egg wash and bake for another 5-10 min.
  9. Pour warmed gravy into the pie through a funnel into the hole in the middle, then serve.

Ale and Onion Soup

One of my go-to recipes for sideboards and lunches is an ale and onion soup; in fact, it’s appeared at almost every sideboard I’ve cooked. It became my go-to because not only is it a solid vegetarian option, but it also really translates well to the modern palate; we commonly eat one form of it as French onion soup. I originally found a recipe for it on Gode Cookery, then modified it to my tastes from there. I always omit saffron due to cost, add minced garlic, and use stout or some other dark beer instead of ale. These are my personal preferences for this soup, and I always serve it with crusty bread.

The original recipe from Gode Cookery:

Oyle soppes. ¶ Take a good quantite of onyons, and myce hem, noyt to smale, & seth hem in faire water, And take hem vppe; and then take a good quantite of stale ale, as .iij. galons, And there-to take a pynte of goode oyle that is fraied, and cast the onyons there-to, And lete al boyle togidre a grete wile; and caste there-to Saffron and salt, And þen put brede, in maner of brewes, and cast the licour there-on, and serue hit forth hote.

– Austin, Thomas. Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books. Harleian MS. 279 & Harl. MS. 4016, with extracts from Ashmole MS. 1429, Laud MS. 553, & Douce MS 55. London: for The Early English Text Society by N. Trübner & Co., 1888.

The Gode Cookery Translation:

Take a good quantity of onions, and mince them, not to small, & boil them in fair water, And take them up; and then take a good quantity of stale ale, as 3 gallons, And there-to take a pint of good oil that is fried, and cast the onions there-to, And let all boil together a great while; and cast there-to Saffron & salt, And then put bread, in manner of brews, and cast the liquid there-on, and serve it forth hot.

As for a recipe — I’m not sure I’ve ever made a small batch of this soup, and I always buy the giant bulk bag of onions for a feast, because I use a lot of them… So the rough recipe follows as such:

Ale and Onion Soup

Ingredients:
Lots of sweet yellow onions, finely sliced
Minced garlic
Butter or canola oil
4 bottles of dark beer
6-8+ boxes of broth
Sage
Salt
Pepper

Directions:
Peele, halve, and thinly slice onions. Sautee with minced garlic in butter or canola oil, then add beer and broth. (Vegetable broth if offering to vegetarians, otherwise use beef broth.) Add salt, pepper, and sage to taste. Serve hot with bread and butter.